Category: Pollution

Energy ConservationfeaturedPollution

The Ozone layer

Ever heard of the Ozone layer and how we constantly contribute to its depletion?

The first time I learned about the Ozone layer, I was in elementary class and I found it interesting. I remember talking to my dad and siblings about it then. Now, let me explain what it means and how we deplete it every day.

The ozone layer is a region of Earth’s stratosphere that absorbs most of the Sun’s ultraviolet radiation. It contains a high concentration of ozone (O3). Don’t get this wrong, the sun’s radiation is essential to humans, animals, and plants’ survival but too much of it is harmful. So basically, what the OL does is absorb a type of radiation called ultraviolet radiation, or UV light, which can penetrate organisms’ protective layers, like skin, damaging DNA molecules in plants and animals.

I’m sure you understand why the ozone layer should be protected at all cost. Unfortunately, it is getting thinner and thinner every day because of a chemical known as Chlorofluorocarbons (CFC). A chlorofluorocarbon is a molecule that contains carbon, chlorine, and fluorine. CFCs are everywhere, mostly in styrofoam and plastic products. Businesses and consumers use them because they’re inexpensive, they don’t catch fire easily, and they don’t usually poison living things. But the CFCs start eating away at the ozone layer once they get blown into the stratosphere.

Before you burn any plastic or styrofoam, bear in mind that you are contributing to the destruction of the one thing that cannot be repaired. So, instead of burning them, recycle them.

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Nigeria And Carbon Credit

The next few years will be important in the development of Nigeria and Carbon Credit.

Due to the increased number of large industries, combustible fossil fuels such as coal, power plant gas, oil, vehicles in Nigeria, the emission of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases has become alarming.

Carbon dioxide is a harmful gas to humans but essential to plants. It can linger in the atmosphere for a thousand years. An increase in the amount of carbon dioxide creates an overabundance of greenhouse gases that trap additional heat. This trapped heat leads to melting ice caps and rising ocean levels.

In other to reduce the rate of harmful effects of these gases, the Kyoto Protocol of 1997 and the Paris Agreement of 2015  laid out international CO2 emissions goals. With the latter ratified by all but six countries, they have given rise to national emissions targets and the regulations to back them.

With these new regulations in force, the pressure on businesses to find ways to reduce their carbon footprint is growing. Most of today’s solutions involve the use of the carbon markets.

The carbon market has successfully turned CO2 emissions into a commodity by giving it a price. These emissions fall into one of two categories: Carbon credits or carbon offsets, and they can both be bought and sold on a carbon market.

A carbon credit is a permit that allows the company that holds it to emit a certain amount of carbon dioxide or other greenhouse gases. One credit permits the emission of a mass equal to one ton of carbon dioxide. It’s aimed at reducing the emission of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere.

Carbon offset on the other hand is a certificate representing the reduction of one ton of carbon dioxide emissions. It is a way of balancing the scales of pollution.  Offset schemes have been used successfully in the past to solve other environmental problems.

According to Bala Wunti, managing director of NAPIMS ( National Petroleum Investment Management Services), Nigeria has earned about €1 million from cutting carbon emission in its oil and gas production in joint projects between TotalEnergies and the NNPC subsidiary, the National Petroleum Investment Management Services (NAPIMS).

In May 2021, Total announced an ambition to get to net-zero emissions by 2050 together with society for its global business across its production and energy products used by its customers.

Through a joint statement developed between Total S.A. and institutional investors – as participants in the global investor initiative Climate 100+1 – Total said it would take 3 major steps towards achieving this ambition.

These include Zero across Total’s worldwide operations by 2050 or sooner, Net Zero across all its production and energy products used by its customers in Europe by 2050 or sooner, 60 percent or more reduction in the average carbon intensity of energy products used worldwide by Total customers by 2050 with intermediate steps of 15 percent by 2030 and 35 percent by 2040.

Since Total and NNPC has taken the first step in Nigeria, it will be good for other top organizations in Nigeria to follow suit. With this development, it is hoped that the reduction of CO2 in Nigeria will be swift.

 

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Why Ventilation is essential

Have you ever wondered why ventilation is essential?

Ventilation is the provision and circulation of fresh air across a room. It is a process that either supplies air into space or removes air from space by natural or mechanical means.

Considering that our lives depend on the intake of air. The quality of the air we inhale in our homes and offices should be closely observed. Although this isn’t the most pressing issue in society, it still plays a vital role in our health, comfort, and productivity.

Ventilation at home and our offices are important to keep the house/office and its occupants healthy and comfortable. It is necessary we learn about the importance of ventilation.

Everyone knows that air is essential to life, but not everyone understands that breathing polluted air is almost as bad as not breathing air at all, as polluted air slowly poisons the whole system.

  Here are some reasons why ventilation is essential 

It eliminates condensations that damage the home and office.

It makes the environment healthier.

A room without proper ventilation breeds dust mites. These dust mites and their airborne detritus thrive in homes that are not effectively ventilated.

When their detritus encounters the skin or is inhaled, it can cause allergic reactions, resulting in asthma attacks, eczema, watering eyes, itching, sneezing, and a runny nose.

It reduces the impact of VOCs.

VOCs are invisible gases, they originate from a wide range of sources including cosmetics, air fresheners, etc.

To reduce this gas, it is important to install an effective ventilation system that will constantly introduce clean, fresh air from the outside to dilute and control VOCs in the home.

It reduces the effect of Radon gas. Radon gas is a colorless, odorless radioactive gas, which is formed by the decay of small amounts of uranium that occur naturally in all rocks and soils.  It produces another radioactive element called Radon’s Daughters, which can attach themselves to dust particles in the air and, if inhaled, they will stick to the airways of the lung.

The World Health Organization (WHO) has linked Radon exposure to between 3 and 14 percent of all lung cancer cases. In a Radon-affected area, it is necessary to install a Positive Input Ventilation system in the homes and offices to help to reduce Radon to safe levels, thereby reducing the risks to your health.

In conclusion, ventilation has a huge positive impact on our health and well-being. Indoor air pollution coupled with bad ventilation can lead to a number of health problems including headaches, allergies, asthma, rashes, and sinusitis. However, this can be avoided with the installation of a good ventilation system.

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Green Bond Project in Lagos

The Green Bond project in Lagos is set to begin.

A Green bond is a type of fixed income instrument. Governments, banks, municipalities, and corporations use green bonds to raise money for new or existing climate and environmental projects. They are aimed at encouraging sustainability and supporting climate and the environment.

Recently, the Lagos State Government signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with Financial Market Dealers Quotations and Financial Sector Deepening Africa (FSD Africa) to raise funds for the Lagos Green Bond Market Development Programme. The government hopes to use the bond to address climate change and environmental challenges in the state.

Governor Sanwo-Olu

Earlier, Governor Sanwo-Olu lamented that climate change is expected to hit developing countries the hardest. Unfortunately, low-lying states such as Lagos are expected to fare the worst.

Despite the devastating effects, the governor noted that investors increasingly viewed climate change as a gateway to new business opportunities. Investors now have an opening to profitably protect the planet – Green Bonds.

Typically, green bonds are commonly used to finance projects like energy efficiency projects, renewable energy projects, and pollution prevention.  Other considerations include Clean Transportation projects, wastewater, and water management projects. Also, green bonds offer tax incentives, such as tax exemptions and tax credits, in order to attract investors to the projects.

As such, the government expects to raise between N25billion and N100billion from the bond issue. This is according to the Special Adviser to the Governor on Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) Mrs. Solape Hammond.

Accordingly, the Chief Executive of FMDQ Group, Bola Onadele-Koko, noted that the project is in line with the Governor’s THEMES agenda. The agenda hopes to achieve the SDGs as highlighted by the United Nations, which includes job creation, economic growth, etc.

Interestingly, the project will tackle goals 6 – clean water and sanitation, 7 – Affordable and clean energy, 8 – Decent and economic growth. More specifically, however, the bond will directly impact goal 13 – climate action of the SDGs.

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Roadside Parking in Lagos

Lagos Roadside parking nuisance

Roadside parking has become one of the major cause of gridlock on the streets of Lagos.

Lagos is the most populous city in Nigeria and the biggest city in Africa. Land is a treasure-trove in Lagos because the city is surrounded by bodies of water. So, anybody that has a space wants to maximize its benefits. Economically, this has its good sides, especially for the land owners.

Houses are now built without provision for parking space so we now have a state where residents park on either side of the road.  This detestable practice is now the order of the day. This has led to ugly acts like stealing cars, car parts, extracting diesel from cars etc. Residents park their cars with fear of probably losing their car or parts of their car which is so disheartening. Also,  pedestrians struggle with vehicles to move on the narrow paths of the road. It has also discouraged citizens from walking on the roads for leisure or exercise for fear of being hit by cars.

Roadside parking has become overbearing and should be fully addressed but how can it be addressed or curbed when houses are without car parks ? Where will residents park their cars?

A recent study conducted by the Lagos State Metropolitan Area Transport Authority, LAMATA, has shown that a major cause of traffic jam in Lagos is Roadside parking.

Building an organized parking facilities in different parts of the city and ensuring that architectures include good parking space in every residential building, school, church or office building plan. This would certainly help reduce traffic along the largely congested roads. Moreover, it will not only reduce traffic but prove to be a revenue generator for the state. If this is appropriately addressed, it will not only create an enabling environment for everyone to live, it will also improve the state of living of everybody in the areas concerned.

Source: http://globalpatriotnews.com/opinion-addressing-the-problem-of-street-parking-in-lagos-by-modupe-ileyemi/

 

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Jollof Rice & The Environment

What does jollof rice have to do with government policy on LPG use? Well, the Federal government is making efforts to encourage citizens to utilize Nigeria’s huge gas reserve and discourage the use of firewood in Nigeria.

wonderwoman, firewood, LPG apathy, wonderbag, smoked fish

Mrs. Koffo posing with her wonderbag in her fish-smoking room.

Meet Mrs. Koffo, a smoked-fish monger at Ibeju lekki. Her husband is a fishnet maker while her son is a fisherman. We came across them during the Zenith Bank-sponsored LPG awareness and empowerment campaign at Ibeju Lekki.

LPG For The Home, Not For Business

Mrs. Koffo, was excited and welcomed the idea of LPG, which she soon started using to make meals at home. However, she frowned at it when she was told that it could also be used to smoke fish. At the time, She dried fish in an enclosed space. Here, she inhales a huge amount of smoke on a daily basis, thus jeopardizing her health.

Team members were quick to observe that Mrs. Koffo looked many years older than her stated age. In every likelihood, her many hours of “smoking” were responsible for this.

Yet, according to her, “the look, feel and taste of the fish will be different if she uses gas”. In the same way, some people would always opt for “firewood rice”(Jollof rice made with firewood), claiming it had a better taste.

Firewood Jollof vs LPG Jollof

The “look and feel” of smoked fish, and the taste of firewood Jollof, are but 2 of the many challenges still to overcome in the drive for LPG use in Nigeria. Policymakers and in this case, policy drivers, must be well aware of the cultural nuances in the country as the campaign progresses. Typically, these age-old norms are hard to change. And when change comes at a seemingly high financial cost, it is even more difficult to effect.

Although we had achieved moderate success during this campaign, we noticed that some traditional practices could hinder the use of LPG in many communities in Nigeria.

 

 

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Maintaining A Healthy Lifestyle In An Unhealthy Environment?

 

 

Making efforts to live a healthy life is important but can we maintain a healthy lifestyle without a healthy environment? Great meals, fruits, and vegetables are essential to healthy living so is living in a healthy environment. Our environment plays a vital role in our health and well-being. It is necessary we pay attention to it.

Taking care of our environment is really not a big deal and can be done by every member of society. We can start from our homes to our compounds to our streets. That way, our environment can never be caught unfresh.

The importance of sanitation and good hygiene cannot be overemphasized.
A healthy environment helps protect women and children from communicable diseases.
Around the world, over 800 children under age five die every day from preventable diseases; diarrhea-related diseases caused by lack of access to water, sanitation, and hygiene.

This can be combated through a healthy lifestyle and habitual sanitation.

Energy ConservationEnvironmental NewsfeaturedPollution

THE BLACK AND WHITE OF TEA BAGS

You would probably be surprised to learn that most tea bags contain up to 25% plastics. The main reason for this is that in order for the tea bags to seal up and keep their shape in hot liquid, a plastic polymer, namely polypropylene, must be added. This is usually so that the tea bag is held in a  shape, which producers claim helps the tea leaves infuse better. Even though the amounts of plastic found in tea bags is minimal and vary between manufacturers it adds up to quite a bit when you look at the big picture.

Due to the plastic content, conventional tea bags cannot completely decompose. This makes them a bad option for compost material and the environment… not to mention your body.

Recent research from McGill University in Canada also found that most types of tea bags leak millions of plastic particles into our drinks not only from the sealing plastic but from the bag itself. Microplastics have widely been found in the environment, in tap and bottled waters, and in some foods. A new study has found that a single plastic teabag steeped at a brewing temperature of 95 degrees Celsius releases around 11.6 billion microplastics and 3.1 billion nanoplastics into a single cup

Most tea bags are made of thin and permeable papers and are not biodegradable. They contain harmful chemicals. The package and material can pollute the environment significantly.

However, it is not all doom and gloom with teabags.

There are few ways to recycle tea bags, including re-soaking used tea bags. This tea-enhanced water actually provides some nutrients if you use it to water your plants.  You can also break open the bag and sprinkle the wet leaves around potted plants for a similar effect.

Used tea bags can also be a great way to keep your glass and mirrors clean. Simply wipe the mirror or glass pane with a moist, used tea bag and dry with a soft cloth.

Leftover tea can even refresh your skin. Add a few used tea bags to a bowl of hot water and hold your head above the steam to moisturize your face. The same idea can be used to calm tired feet, too. Simply add the used tea bags and warm water to a soaking basin, immerse your feet, and relax.

So what do you do with your used tea bags?

Environmental NewsPollution

UNFAMILIAR MATTERS ON GLITTERS

Glitter is the icing on the cake of the craft and makeup world. Made of tiny pieces of plastic bonded with aluminum, glitters are quite charming but dangerous.

According to scientific research, glitters are hazardous to the environment; especially the world’s ocean. When washed down the drain they become a subset of marine plastic litter known as micro-plastic.

It usually takes four weeks to degrade. However, the degrading process varies and depends on the size, environment and other factors such as heat.

Most glitters do not degrade in clean water as it takes microorganisms to start the degrading process.

The safest way to dispose of these fanciful plastics is to permanently glue it to something you plan to hold on to for a long time. They should not be washed down the sink.

For a greener alternative, salt glitters (which basically involves the use of food coloring and salt) could be used as a substitute for plastic glitters.

 

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SANITATION AND HYGIENE

Sanitation and hygiene are critical to health, survival and development.
Many countries are challenged in providing adequate sanitation for their entire populations, leaving people at risk for water.

Throughout the world, an estimated 2.4 billion people lack basic sanitation (more than 32% of the world’s population).
Basic sanitation is described as having access to facilities for the safe disposal of human waste (feces and urine), as well as having the ability to maintain hygienic conditions, industrial or hazardous waste management, and wastewater treatment and disposal.

The importance of sanitation and good hygiene cannot be overemphasized.
A healthy environment helps protect women and children from communicable diseases.
Around the world, over 800 children under age five die everyday from preventable diseases; diarrhea related diseases caused by lack of access to water, sanitation and hygiene.

This can be combated through a healthy lifestyle and habitual sanitation.